100 days in cleveland

i'm trying to draw a picture of something i like about cleveland every day for 100 days.

prints available at juliaincleveland.etsy.com
juliaskuo@gmail.com
Day 93/100
Severance Hall
This is the home of the famous Cleveland Orchestra - one of the top 5 in the country (and some say the world!) It’s located on Euclid right in between the Wade museum cluster and Case campus. Lucky Case students get to walk past this everyday! I’ve been here twice to hear Rachmaninoff’s piano concertos and Handel’s Messiah. I really like this little Wikipedia blurb:
"Cleveland is the smallest city amongst the traditional "Big Five"  orchestras; the others are based in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and  Chicago. However, musicians in Cleveland are often treated as local  celebrities, and, much like sports heroes elsewhere, fans seek  autographs after performances and greet musicians on the street.  Clevelanders are proud that their city boasts an orchestra rated on par  with or above those in much larger cities.[4][5] In the 1960s fans were known to “have airport rallies when the  orchestra comes home from tour [and] chant, ‘We’re the best! We’re the  best!’ and carry placards reading ‘Bravo!’” [4]" 
(You’ll notice that I skipped Day 92 - I just realized that I counted Day 47 twice. Whoops, but what a nice surprise!)

Day 93/100

Severance Hall

This is the home of the famous Cleveland Orchestra - one of the top 5 in the country (and some say the world!) It’s located on Euclid right in between the Wade museum cluster and Case campus. Lucky Case students get to walk past this everyday! I’ve been here twice to hear Rachmaninoff’s piano concertos and Handel’s Messiah. I really like this little Wikipedia blurb:

"Cleveland is the smallest city amongst the traditional "Big Five" orchestras; the others are based in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago. However, musicians in Cleveland are often treated as local celebrities, and, much like sports heroes elsewhere, fans seek autographs after performances and greet musicians on the street. Clevelanders are proud that their city boasts an orchestra rated on par with or above those in much larger cities.[4][5] In the 1960s fans were known to “have airport rallies when the orchestra comes home from tour [and] chant, ‘We’re the best! We’re the best!’ and carry placards reading ‘Bravo!’” [4]"

(You’ll notice that I skipped Day 92 - I just realized that I counted Day 47 twice. Whoops, but what a nice surprise!)

Day 91/100
Music Saves
This cd and record shop in the Collinswood Arts District seems to  magically carry only music that I want to listen to. I have no portable  digital music player (ipod, iphone, anything..)  and I still love buying  CDs when they come out! Starting in college I got into the habit of  going to the music store to pick out CDs of artists I knew and to pick out an extra CD just by its cover. I’ve found both really great  and really weird music that way. I like the fact that Music Saves used a  rolodex system for frequent buyers up until this year, and almost wish  they hadn’t upgraded to a computer system =)

Day 91/100

Music Saves

This cd and record shop in the Collinswood Arts District seems to magically carry only music that I want to listen to. I have no portable digital music player (ipod, iphone, anything..)  and I still love buying CDs when they come out! Starting in college I got into the habit of going to the music store to pick out CDs of artists I knew and to pick out an extra CD just by its cover. I’ve found both really great and really weird music that way. I like the fact that Music Saves used a rolodex system for frequent buyers up until this year, and almost wish they hadn’t upgraded to a computer system =)

Day 90/100
Nepalese food
This is a straight up plug for the restaurant Flavors of India in North Olmsted. I have a special spot in my heart for this restaurant because of the story behind the people who own it. It was recently bought by a kind and hard working Nepalese family who came to Cleveland a few years ago as relocated Nepalese refugees. The restaurant was originally an Indian restaurant (as you can see by the name) but they’ve slowly introduced Himalayan and Nepalese food to the menu. I’m fascinated by Nepalese food because it seems to be a combination of Indian and Chinese food. The dishes look familiar to me but taste completely different! For example, the dishes pictured above would look like beef noodle soup and dumplings to any Chinese person.. but when you bite in you actually taste curry and spices =) They are lamb thukpa (noodles with lamb meat and vegetables cooked in traditional Tibetan style) and Chicken momo (minced chicken mixed with Nepali spices and steamed inside the flour dough served with Nepali achar and soup). If you go as a big group I would highly recommend getting one of the combination dinners. Newari thali includes drinks, starters of grilled lamb, 3 small dishes of different curried meats with rice and naan, and desserts of rice pudding or gajar halwa (amazing, amazing sweet carrot dessert). Please go and support my friends!Flavors of India(440) 779-577426703 Brookpark Rd ExtNorth Olmsted,                                        OH 44070
 (Lunchtime is usually an Indian buffet, so ask for the Nepalese menu)

Day 90/100

Nepalese food

This is a straight up plug for the restaurant Flavors of India in North Olmsted. I have a special spot in my heart for this restaurant because of the story behind the people who own it. It was recently bought by a kind and hard working Nepalese family who came to Cleveland a few years ago as relocated Nepalese refugees. The restaurant was originally an Indian restaurant (as you can see by the name) but they’ve slowly introduced Himalayan and Nepalese food to the menu. I’m fascinated by Nepalese food because it seems to be a combination of Indian and Chinese food. The dishes look familiar to me but taste completely different! For example, the dishes pictured above would look like beef noodle soup and dumplings to any Chinese person.. but when you bite in you actually taste curry and spices =) They are lamb thukpa (noodles with lamb meat and vegetables cooked in traditional Tibetan style) and Chicken momo (minced chicken mixed with Nepali spices and steamed inside the flour dough served with Nepali achar and soup). If you go as a big group I would highly recommend getting one of the combination dinners. Newari thali includes drinks, starters of grilled lamb, 3 small dishes of different curried meats with rice and naan, and desserts of rice pudding or gajar halwa (amazing, amazing sweet carrot dessert). Please go and support my friends!

Flavors of India
(440) 779-5774
26703 Brookpark Rd Ext
North Olmsted, OH 44070

(Lunchtime is usually an Indian buffet, so ask for the Nepalese menu)

Day 89/100
Cleveland’s skyline
I like our modest little skyline! Can you point out the Key Tower, Terminal Tower, and the Huntington Bank Tower (BP Building)? My favorite views are from the Lorain-Carnegie bridge and on W.5th in Tremont next to Sokolowski’s and Fat Cat’s - I’ve always wanted to have a little nighttime picnic in the middle of the road right by the railing, but that wouldn’t be very safe.

Day 89/100

Cleveland’s skyline

I like our modest little skyline! Can you point out the Key Tower, Terminal Tower, and the Huntington Bank Tower (BP Building)? My favorite views are from the Lorain-Carnegie bridge and on W.5th in Tremont next to Sokolowski’s and Fat Cat’s - I’ve always wanted to have a little nighttime picnic in the middle of the road right by the railing, but that wouldn’t be very safe.

Day 88/100
The Guardians of Traffic
These art deco style pylons stand guard over the Lorain-Carnegie bridge (now known as the Hope Memorial Bridge) that separates the east and west side of Cleveland. The 8 figures were carved in sandstone and created by sculptor Henry Hering and architect Frank Walker. They were meant to “typify the spirit of progress in transportation”, so each figure holds a different form of ground transport.Does anyone else remember when some of these statues were sporting Lebron headbands in his last season here? Even though it’s a bittersweet (or just bitter) memory for most Clevelanders, I like thinking about how the passionate and unified the city seemed in those last few games. It couldn’t have been easy to get those headbands on these humongous things. And where do you get giant, statue-sized headbands anyway?

Day 88/100

The Guardians of Traffic

These art deco style pylons stand guard over the Lorain-Carnegie bridge (now known as the Hope Memorial Bridge) that separates the east and west side of Cleveland. The 8 figures were carved in sandstone and created by sculptor Henry Hering and architect Frank Walker. They were meant to “typify the spirit of progress in transportation”, so each figure holds a different form of ground transport.

Does anyone else remember when some of these statues were sporting Lebron headbands in his last season here? Even though it’s a bittersweet (or just bitter) memory for most Clevelanders, I like thinking about how the passionate and unified the city seemed in those last few games. It couldn’t have been easy to get those headbands on these humongous things. And where do you get giant, statue-sized headbands anyway?

Day 87/100
Playhouse Square Center
This performing arts center houses NPR’s Idea Center and numerous theaters where you can come to see concerts, dance, plays, comedy, opera, and speakers. I’ve seen Phantom of the Opera, Frost Nixon, Flannigan’s Wake, and Andrew Bird here - that’s a musical, play, comedy, and concert! I’ve even been here for a wedding. My first real exposure to Cleveland was in the State Theater for my cousin’s Chinese-Indian wedding (the Indian ceremonies were performed on the theater stage, and the reception was held in the theater’s gorgeous Italian Renaissance style lobby). Once a friend and I rushed here for what we thought was a jazz concert, and were so late that we arrived during intermission. We should have realized something was off when we saw that everyone was dressed in formal wear, but didn’t realize we had walked into the middle of an opera until the curtain came up and we saw an entire winter themed set with fake snow and 18th century characters singing in Italian!

Day 87/100

Playhouse Square Center

This performing arts center houses NPR’s Idea Center and numerous theaters where you can come to see concerts, dance, plays, comedy, opera, and speakers. I’ve seen Phantom of the Opera, Frost Nixon, Flannigan’s Wake, and Andrew Bird here - that’s a musical, play, comedy, and concert! I’ve even been here for a wedding. My first real exposure to Cleveland was in the State Theater for my cousin’s Chinese-Indian wedding (the Indian ceremonies were performed on the theater stage, and the reception was held in the theater’s gorgeous Italian Renaissance style lobby).
Once a friend and I rushed here for what we thought was a jazz concert, and were so late that we arrived during intermission. We should have realized something was off when we saw that everyone was dressed in formal wear, but didn’t realize we had walked into the middle of an opera until the curtain came up and we saw an entire winter themed set with fake snow and 18th century characters singing in Italian!

Day 86/100 - The Metroparks (Part 2 - South Chagrin Reservation)
This is my default park - where I come whenever I want to feel like getting out of the city for a bit. It’s one of the smaller Metroparks but it’s got its share of little gems, like an arboretum and a short trail along the Chagrin River. Apparently there’s a lot that I haven’t seen, including Squaw Rock! I always park at the Harper Ridge picnic area to see the fall colors, to take a winter walk (nothing beats running through a meadow covered with snow!), to go on a first springtime run, or for a warm summer bike ride.

Day 86/100 - The Metroparks (Part 2 - South Chagrin Reservation)

This is my default park - where I come whenever I want to feel like getting out of the city for a bit. It’s one of the smaller Metroparks but it’s got its share of little gems, like an arboretum and a short trail along the Chagrin River. Apparently there’s a lot that I haven’t seen, including Squaw Rock! I always park at the Harper Ridge picnic area to see the fall colors, to take a winter walk (nothing beats running through a meadow covered with snow!), to go on a first springtime run, or for a warm summer bike ride.

Day 85/100
Chagrin Falls
This tiny town is home to a little waterfall, the original Dewey’s popcorn shop, a newly opened Jeni’s Ice cream, and boutiques including the upscale Hermes shop. I originally heard about Chagrin Falls because of Bill Watterson - if you’re familiar with the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes, this is where the artist grew up! As a kid who spent most of elementary school reading and attempting to copy and redraw his strips, it’s amazing to look around in every season and imagine that this was the backdrop of all of those stories. I used to think that the neighborhood Calvin lived in was just any cold place with seasons and snow, but now I can picture him toboganning through the woods here and tiptoeing on a fallen log over a river in a park off of Chagrin River Valley Rd.! I intentionally drew Jeni’s into this picture because I am so happy that it can now call Cleveland its home. This Columbus-based ice cream shop is home to delicious flavors like riesling poached pear, salted caramel, and pistachio honey! (You can also find it sold by the pint in specialty markets like Miles Farmers Market and Nature’s Bin, or you can be lucky enough to have a roommate who recently got an ice cream maker and Jeni’s cookbook)

Day 85/100

Chagrin Falls

This tiny town is home to a little waterfall, the original Dewey’s popcorn shop, a newly opened Jeni’s Ice cream, and boutiques including the upscale Hermes shop. I originally heard about Chagrin Falls because of Bill Watterson - if you’re familiar with the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes, this is where the artist grew up! As a kid who spent most of elementary school reading and attempting to copy and redraw his strips, it’s amazing to look around in every season and imagine that this was the backdrop of all of those stories. I used to think that the neighborhood Calvin lived in was just any cold place with seasons and snow, but now I can picture him toboganning through the woods here and tiptoeing on a fallen log over a river in a park off of Chagrin River Valley Rd.!
I intentionally drew Jeni’s into this picture because I am so happy that it can now call Cleveland its home. This Columbus-based ice cream shop is home to delicious flavors like riesling poached pear, salted caramel, and pistachio honey! (You can also find it sold by the pint in specialty markets like Miles Farmers Market and Nature’s Bin, or you can be lucky enough to have a roommate who recently got an ice cream maker and Jeni’s cookbook)

Day 84/100
Sweet Moses
This is the most charming sweets shop ever. It looks like it came out of the 1950s, complete with shiny embossed copper registers on marble counters and an old fashioned soda fountain and popcorn maker. Everyone who works there wears a crisp white shirt and a little paper triangle hat (what are those really called?). Aside from their signature fountain specialties, you can order homemade ice cream, sundaes, marble, popcorn, and grilled cheese varieties! And best of all it’s named after Moses Cleaveland. The Gordon Square shop’s very cute explanation of the naming goes like this: “Maybe it’s the fact that his name was misspelled, but virtually every portrait and statue of our city’s founder, Moses Cleaveland, depicts a man with a scowl on his face. So what would it have taken him to get to smile? WE HAVE AN IDEA.”

Day 84/100

Sweet Moses

This is the most charming sweets shop ever. It looks like it came out of the 1950s, complete with shiny embossed copper registers on marble counters and an old fashioned soda fountain and popcorn maker. Everyone who works there wears a crisp white shirt and a little paper triangle hat (what are those really called?). Aside from their signature fountain specialties, you can order homemade ice cream, sundaes, marble, popcorn, and grilled cheese varieties! And best of all it’s named after Moses Cleaveland. The Gordon Square shop’s very cute explanation of the naming goes like this: “Maybe it’s the fact that his name was misspelled, but virtually every portrait and statue of our city’s founder, Moses Cleaveland, depicts a man with a scowl on his face. So what would it have taken him to get to smile? WE HAVE AN IDEA.”

Day 83/100The Geauga County FairWe have county fairs in  LA too but there’s no way that it’s the same. This is probably the most  exciting event that I could take an out-of-towner to. From the point I  passed an Amish parking lot full of horse drawn buggies, I knew that I  was seeing the real deal. This was the first time I ever saw a 4-H show, and a real  livestock auction (and almost bid on a pig by accident!). Did you know that the auctioneer’s calling price isn’t the total  bid - it’s the amount you’re paying per pound of the animal’s weight??  Those pigs can get really heavy… This animal here is an alpaca - now increasingly bred for wool in the  states. I love the animal tents where you can see tons of varieties of  sheep, goats, alpacas, and bunnies. I also love all the animals you can eat… I almost passed out after the gluttony of eating ribs, pulled pork,  bison burgers, corn on the cob, elephant ears, cheesy corn dogs, and  mint chocolate chip ice cream. I think there was more, but I can’t  remember anymore. ..Among the events I always manage to miss there’s  the Demolition Derby, the Truck Pull, and something called the Chicken  Flying Contest (which sounds awesome). Next year!

Day 83/100

The Geauga County Fair

We have county fairs in LA too but there’s no way that it’s the same. This is probably the most exciting event that I could take an out-of-towner to. From the point I passed an Amish parking lot full of horse drawn buggies, I knew that I was seeing the real deal. This was the first time I ever saw a 4-H show, and a real livestock auction (and almost bid on a pig by accident!). Did you know that the auctioneer’s calling price isn’t the total bid - it’s the amount you’re paying per pound of the animal’s weight?? Those pigs can get really heavy…
This animal here is an alpaca - now increasingly bred for wool in the states. I love the animal tents where you can see tons of varieties of sheep, goats, alpacas, and bunnies. I also love all the animals you can eat… I almost passed out after the gluttony of eating ribs, pulled pork, bison burgers, corn on the cob, elephant ears, cheesy corn dogs, and mint chocolate chip ice cream. I think there was more, but I can’t remember anymore. ..
Among the events I always manage to miss there’s the Demolition Derby, the Truck Pull, and something called the Chicken Flying Contest (which sounds awesome). Next year!